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Swedish Lessons

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Sandra has successfully completed an LD4all Quest!
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PostPosted: Sun 05 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

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Nevon
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PostPosted: Mon 06 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

Det här var en mycket intressant tråd. Jag har hittat en kort liten novell, men jag är rädd att den kan vara lite för svår. Vill ni så kan ni ju prova att översätta stycken så kan vi svenskar rätta eftersom. Glasögon-Fias upplevelser

Vocabulary
pryda = to be decorative (sorta)
bilfärd = Drive (not as in the verb, think "a drive")
Ängar = fields
svischa = to swoosh tounge2
dock = though
ideala = ideal
förhållandet = relationship, condition
sängbordet = the table by the bed
pga. (på grund av) = because of
slarva = neglect
hemsk = terrible
tvål = soap
torrputsa = polish without any liquid
följd = result
skina = shine
glänsa = shine

Enough for now, if there's a word you don't understand just check in a dictionary. This one is pretty good


//Translation:
This was a very interesting thread. I've found a short novel, but I'm afraid it might be a little too hard. If you want to you can try translating parts of it, and then we Swedes can correct it. Fia-Glasses experiences


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Larry Boy
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PostPosted: Tue 07 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

The Swedish word order is very strange.

I went to school = Jag gick till skolan

So far, everything fine...

BUT

Then I went to school = Sen gick jag till skolan

If you translate word by word into English: "Then went I to school"

I can't think of more examples right now, but I can assure you that as you start to write more complex sentences, more and more words will have to be thrown around like this. This is one of the biggest problems non-native speakers have with Swedish, and I understand that it's confusing to them. I think I've heard somewhere that some linguists regard the Swedish word order as one of the most confusing there is.

On a sidenote, there is a Swedish novel called "Ett öga rött" where the author uses grammatically wrong Swedish (with what most foreigners would regard a more "natural" word order) throughout all of the book, since the main character is a non-native speaker of Swedish. It's kinda cool, and this "incorrect" Swedish has become almost a language on its own since about 10% of our population is foreign in origin.


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garebear
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PostPosted: Wed 08 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

i love sweden. how bout i just move there, ill learn it quicker. anyone willing to let me live with them till i pick up the language and become a freelance translator/guide and spend my days at the airport picking up american customers. or just get a normal job. what is there to do for fun in sweden.

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Nevon
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PostPosted: Wed 08 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

That depends on where in Sweden you'd like to live. If you liv up north, there's not much of a nightlife. Instead you do "manly" stuff, like kiling polarbears etc. (j/k) But if you live in the middle/southern part you can do more or less the same things that you can do wherever it is you live now.

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Hradska
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PostPosted: Wed 08 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

Larry Boy wrote:
The Swedish word order is very strange.

I went to school = Jag gick till skolan

So far, everything fine...

BUT

Then I went to school = Sen gick jag till skolan

If you translate word by word into English: "Then went I to school"


I am not sure, but I think it works like this, whenever there is time specification in the beginning of sentense: like when, after,in the morning, the word order changes from the typical: I went to school, to Nar gick jag till skolan. (when went I till school).

If the time is specified at the end of the sentense, then the words stay in the same order...

Correct me if I am wrong ...


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Hallstrom
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PostPosted: Wed 08 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

It changes in questions too:

Jag gick till skolan - I went to school.
Gick du till skolan? - Went you to school?


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Lanina
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PostPosted: Wed 08 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

I've also heard linguists say that the swedish "sj"-sound is very unique. uhh

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Aikho
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PostPosted: Wed 08 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

the way norwegians say æ (ä in swedish) is not anything close to the swedish ä the swedish ä is more like a norwegian e

Swedish "älvorna"
Norwedish "elvorna"
English "the elves"


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Lanina
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PostPosted: Wed 08 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

Yes, ä is sometimes pronounced as "e" (like in äpple, älva etc) and sometimes as "ä"/"ae" (like in ärta, nära).
The swedish word for is is written "är", but in spoken language it is sometimes pronounced as "e".


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Nevon
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PostPosted: Wed 08 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

Quote:
The swedish word for is is written "är", but in spoken language it is sometimes pronounced as "e".
Yes, but that depends on what dialekt you speak. Where I come from (the southern edge of the northern part of Sweden eh) we say "är", but where you come from they say "e".

Doesn't anyone have a microphone? It would be a lot easier to explain the different sounds that way.
Hehe, imagine one of the non-swedish people here trying to say "kjol" (skirt), "tjock" (fat), or "sjuk" (sick). :D


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PostPosted: Thu 09 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

Lanina wrote:
I've also heard linguists say that the swedish "sj"-sound is very unique. uhh


yes it's a uniquely swedish sound (or so i've read). I've had trouble pronouncing that one. I had one recording saying "sju" (seven) and for the first few times it sounded to me very much like "fu" eek2

For a while i was pronouncing it like german "ch"... Then i realised i can approximate it better by saying "khu" first then removing the "k"... also i can pronounce it by flattening the "X" sound of my language... i got that idea when i read that arab immigrants in Sweden usually pronounce "sj" as X smile

Now i can pronounce it fast and without pre-practice but still everytime i think in my head what a funny sound it is ^^


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Olesia
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PostPosted: Thu 09 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

Lanina wrote:
I've also heard linguists say that the swedish "sj"-sound is very unique. uhh


Yeah, tons of people have problems with that sound if they're not originally from Sweden. Trying to think of a sound like that in english, or at least a similar sound, but I can't really come to think of any... "Sk" can also be pronounced as the same sound, for example in "skillnad" or "skön"

When me and my family first came to sweden they spelled my name like "Olesja", cause, well, they thought it would be "Oles-ja" but instead it turned my name into this horrible "Olescha" or something lol. Now it's just Olesia, thank God lol.

Dream on. // Olesia


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Lanina
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PostPosted: Thu 09 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

[quote="Nevon"]
Quote:

Doesn't anyone have a microphone? It would be a lot easier to explain the different sounds that way.
Hehe, imagine one of the non-swedish people here trying to say "kjol" (skirt), "tjock" (fat), or "sjuk" (sick). :D


I can't get my microphone to work sadblauw But I wouldn't be a good person to teach people how to say "sj" because I tend to say it wrong sometimes. My mother comes from Finland, so I learnt finnish first as a child. And finnish does not have any "sj" sounds, except some similar sounds in loan words. Like "sheikki" (sheik, shejk in swedish).

When I just had started school some other kids picked on me because i couldn't pronounce "tjuv" (theif) or "sju" (seven). overspannen


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Nevon
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PostPosted: Thu 09 Mar, 2006  Reply with quote

I actually borrowed a microphone from a friend, but it turns out that my sound card sucks, so I can't use it. It shouldn't be that hard to find a recording of someone saying "tjuv" or "sjuk" etc... I would have looked for one now, but right now I'm on this 3G-card, so my connection is super-slow. Unless someone else finds one, I'll look for one when I get back to my mom's, that'll be around monday or tuesday (I think).

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